Environmental Auditing

We offer the following services to industry and government:

  • Phase I Environmental Site Assessments (ESAs)
  • Phase II ESAs
  • Phase III ESAs
  • Environmental Audits

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND AUDITS

With increasing awareness and requirements to demonstrate environmentally sustainable development, voluntary international standards are being promulgated to define and assess the integrity of the management of environmental impacts. These new standards are intended to balance and integrate the interests of an organization and society to foster sustainable development.

The definition of an environmental management system (EMS) is the organizational structure, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes and resources for implementing environmental management. The environmental quality of an organization can be equated to its service quality or product quality.

In the same way that product quality is the subject of an ISO series of standards, so is environmental quality the subject of standards for the EMS. There are also standards for auditing the EMS. An audit can address one or all of the areas of compliance, the EMS itself, health and safety, or waste reduction.

The motivation for the development of an EMS and its audit are:

  • reducing costs by being proactive
  • avoiding costs from cleanup or litigation
  • improved customer or community profile
  • improved internal culture
  • green marketing opportunities
  • meeting the standards of trading partners
  • due diligence

TYPES OF AUDITS

Regulatory Compliance Audits - EMS Audits - examine the appropriateness and likelihood of success of the corporation's resources allocated to deliver environmental management, i.e. the system itself is audited as opposed to the individual component programs. Health and Safety Audits

Regulatory Compliance Audits - examine organizational performance against specific standards most frequently external but could be internal standards, if in place.

EMS Audits - examine the appropriateness and likelihood of success of the corporation's resources allocated to deliver environmental management, i.e. the system itself is audited as opposed to the individual component programs.

Health and Safety Audits - evaluate the adequacy of systems in place for the protection of the human environment through an evaluation of policies, procedures and training for measuring, monitoring and documenting the impact of plant chemicals and physical processes on workers.

Waste Reduction Audits - look at ways to avoid compliance concerns through consideration of alternatives, e.g. using different feedstocks, reformulating the product altogether, modifying or improving control of the process, improving housekeeping and assessing opportunities for recycling to turn waste into cost recovery.

CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT

The concept of continual improvement is central to the ISO 14001 model of environmental management. Companies embarking on this type of EMS registration should realize that simple compliance may not be enough in the future and that compliance with internally derived environmental management policies where economically achievable will be the norm.